Gypset

Canggu, Bali, August 2016

Buddhist Monastery, Banjar, Bali, August 2016

Yogi at Hindu Monastery, Kauai, Hawaii, March 2014

By Kayse Budd, M.D., Holistic Psychiatrist, Astrologer, Poet, and Educator

 May 2020

An Ayurvedic approach to depression takes into account mental, spiritual, and physical aspects of health and well-being. Within Ayurveda, there are three subsets of depression corresponding to the three doshas.


 

Depression is one of the most common mental illnesses worldwide, affecting approximately 300 million people (4.4 percent of the world’s population) and 17.3 million US adults (approximately 1 in 12). Women are nearly twice as likely as men (8.7 percent vs. 5.3 percent) to suffer from depression, with adolescence, postpartum, and perimenopause being especially risky times. Depression has a significant economic impact. It is the leading cause of disability worldwide. It is also one of the most common reasons people seek out integrative or complementary therapies and providers.

Psychological Perspectives

Healing depression is something that requires time, focus, and effort on multiple levels. Here are five key psychological steps that can provide a useful foundation for the endeavor.

  1. Choose to accept the self exactly as it is—with the parents, the body, and the circumstances present. Trust that things are as they are for a reason, even if you do not understand it. Few people live up to the exact ideal they have for themselves. To be happy, you have to choose to care for (and eventually love) yourself as you are, including your perceived flaws and difficulties.
  2. Make constant inquiry into your mind and heart. Be mindful of your emotions throughout the day. This could mean catching a stream of negative self-talk and substituting more supportive affirmations (classic cognitive therapy and pratipaksha-bhavana in ancient yogic philosophy). It could also mean changing what you are doing (behavioral therapy).
  3. Honor your yes and no. A factor in many cases of depression involves not honoring your truth. The question“What do I want (right now)?” is important. Take action to follow things that feel aligned with your authentic yes. Say no to things that feel uncomfortable in your body or heart.
  4. Take responsibility for your choices. If you feel your goals and wishes (your “yesses”) are being rejected—by life, yourself, partner, or family—you often end up unhappy. This is a complex issue, however. Dreams and wishes are not always straightforward. “Yes” is not always crystal clear. It is important to acknowledge this. Otherwise, you can mistakenly blame other people for your choices and your happiness. Remember: You need challenges to develop specific strengths, which are the fuel for spiritual growth. In turn, you can help others in similar situations.
  5. See the self holistically. All seemingly negative traits have positive aspects. The core qualities of people’s most “negative” traits are often tied to their greatest strengths. As a psychiatrist who is also an astrologer, I have found several patterns of susceptibility to depression in people’s astrological charts. Saturn (order, restriction, heaviness) is usually involved, as is Pluto (intensity, transformation, obsession). A prominent Saturn may make someone depression-prone, but it also makes them conscientious, reliable, and capable—very useful traits.  A prominent Pluto can make a person depressed but also determined, resilient, and charismatic.

Ayurvedic Perspectives

Viewed through an Ayurvedic lens, depression is usually thought of as a Kapha imbalance—heaviness, sadness, and general stagnation. Apathy, low energy, poor mood, and reduced movement are part of the official criteria psychiatrists use to diagnose depression. These symptoms are all Kapha problems, which suggests that the Kapha element is indeed out of balance in most cases of clinical depression.

From a more comprehensive Ayurvedic standpoint, there are three subtly different types of depression corresponding to the three doshas. These unique types of depression may preferentially affect people of that same primary dosha. They can also affect people of a different primary dosha who have the affected dosha(s) out of balance.

Kapha Depression

Associated with lethargy, increased sleep, poor motivation, despondency, and ama(toxicity), lies Kapha depression. It is the most common and longest-lasting type--due to the inherently slow-moving nature of Kapha. The treatment approach varies but includes the general principles of increasing movement, reducing toxicity, and enhancing ojas(vitality). Some science-backed recommendations are:

  • Thirty minutes of yoga daily (especially Sun Salutations)
  • Thirty minutes of outdoor exercise daily (start gentle and increase to moderate intensity). Spend time in nature at least once a week.
  • Increase fresh vegetables in your diet. Reduce processed foods and sugars (including alcohol, which is a depressant).
  • Eat warm, spicy meals. Reduce cold food and smoothies. Add pungent, warming herbs such as cayenne and cinnamon to meals.
  • Consider fresh-squeezed veggie juice to help the body detoxify. A program of physician-supervised cleansing (called panchakarma in Ayurveda) could be helpful.
  • Consume ginger tea morning and night. (Cut and boil a 2–3-inch piece of organic ginger. Steep 20 minutes.) Also helpful for Vata depression.
  • Take 350–400 mg of the herb ashwagandha morning and night. Ashwagandhaenhances thyroid function, and supplementing the thyroid is a standard adjunct treatment for depression within Western psychiatry. Caution for Pitta dosha or Pitta-type depression (see below), as increased thyroid activity could actually worsen agitation in that population. Ashwagandha is helpful for Vata, however.
  • Consume 1 teaspoon dulse, nori, wakame, or other seaweed three times per week. Seaweeds can cause a subtle increase in energy, metabolism, and body temperature with a possible slight reduction in depression.
  • Take 20–30 mg/day of the spice saffron.
    • Use caution and discuss with your physician if already on an SSRI or other pharmaceutical.
  • Perform a daily self-massage (abhyanga) with a warming oil, such as sesame. Massageis known to reduce cortisol levels and increase serotonin/dopamine, making it a useful practice for depression.
  • Consider 120–250 mg/morning of the herb Rhodiola.
    • Use caution/discuss with your physician if on SSRIs.
  • Consider taking 500–2,000 mg/day of cardamom. Cardamom reduces inflammation, congestion, and mucus throughout the body (possibly also helping irritable bowel or inflammatory bowel disorder). It has an indirect effect on depression.
  • Avoid binge-watching, excessive internet use, and similar sedentary activities, as these promote Kapha accumulation.
  • Clean the house, make the bed, bathe, and get dressed daily. Set a commitment for social interaction one to three times/week. Taking action to promote vitality is essential.

Pitta Depression

Like Pitta imbalancePitta depression is a more agitated state. It is highlighted by frustration, anger, irritability, and impulsivity. There is a higher risk of suicide with this type of depression due to the impulsivity and agitation. In traditional psychiatry, this might be thought of as a “mixed depression” (depression blended with manic or bipolar symptoms) or an “agitated depression.” This condition may be more common in a person who has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder or has some tendencies along the bipolar spectrum.

Pitta depression can be improved by general principles of cooling and soothing. Research-based remedies include the following:

  • Twenty to thirty minutes of slow, restorative yoga daily. Avoid hot yoga and excessively vigorous exercise.
  • Meditate for 20 minutes daily, possibly under a tree in nature.
  • Walk by the ocean, a lake, or a stream for at least 30–60 minutes a day. Water is cooling for Pitta.
  • Increase alkalinity in the body through green drinks, salads, and fresh vegetables.
  • Increase cooling foods, such as fresh fruit and smoothies.
  • Avoid spicy food, which imbalances Pitta.
  • Avoid alcohol during healing (and be mindful afterward). Alcohol is acidic, which aggravates Pitta.
  • Aloe vera juice can be helpful to Pitta. One cup or more per day is cooling and anti-inflammatory. Since inflammation is a factor in many cases of depression, there is a probable indirect effect on depression.
  • Consider taking 400–800 mg/day of the herb shatavari (asparagus racemosus). It is a cooling herb with a balancing effect for Pitta. In Ayurveda, balancing the doshas impacts the mood.
  • Bacopa is another Pitta-balancing herb with promise regarding depression. This herb is also being studied for schizophrenia, ADHD/focus, memory, epilepsy, and anxiety. Start with 350–400 mg/day to start; work up to 800 mg/day, if well tolerated.
  • Ginkgo is a cooling herb best known for its neuroprotective benefits; aim for 120–240 mg/day. It seems these do extend (at least partially) to mood.
    • Do not take if you are on a blood thinner, including aspirin, or if you have been diagnosed with a bleeding disorder.
  • Begin daily consumption of cilantro (a handful/day) and coriander seed (1 teaspoon/meal). Both are cooling, and cilantro is detoxifying, especially for heavy metals. Five to 10 chlorella (edible algae) tablets optimize the effect.
  • Consider an organized cleansing program, including liver support herbs.
  • Sweet tastes and fragrances such as rose and other flowers balance Pitta. (Lavender and rose aromatherapy improved depression and anxiety in a group of post-partum women vs. control.) Rose essential oil diffused daily or used on the skin with a carrier oil may help balance Pitta (and Vata).
  • The Ayurvedic herb arjuna can be helpful to balance sadhaka Pitta, the aspect of Pittathat governs emotions. Arjuna has a long history of use for various dysfunctions of the heart muscle (heart failure, palpitations, hypertension), but it also seems to have an emotionally soothing aspect. Take 500–1,000mg/day.

Vata Depression

Characterized by worry, restlessness, insomnia, and “ungroundedness,” a person with Vatadepression often will have an overload of the stress hormone cortisol. They generally have pushed themselves (or felt pushed) beyond their capabilities and become overwhelmed. This is a bit like the classic “nervous breakdown,” which is not an official medical diagnosis. In psychiatry, Vata depression is usually thought of as a combined anxiety-depressive disorder. There is a strong ruminative component to this state—an inability to shut off the mind.

Key principles for healing Vata depression are grounding, warming, and calming. A few specific recommendations for Vata-type depression are:

  • Aim for 15–30 minutes yoga daily, followed by 15–30 minutes of seated meditation. Routine and discipline are very helpful for Vata.
  • Loneliness is common in Vata depression, so commit to at least one social activity/week.
  • Connection to nature is crucial due to the inherently ungrounded qualities of Vata. Spending 30 minutes or more outside every day—sitting on the ground, touching a tree, or gardening—can be highly therapeutic.
  • Increase consumption of warm, nourishing whole foods such as soup, kitchari, and baked vegetables. Avoid dry, processed food (chips, crackers) and reduce cold foods (salads, smoothies).
  • Drink 2 tablespoons of loose tulsi (holy basil) tea three or four times a day. Alternatively, take 800–-1,000 mg/day in capsule form.
  • The Western herbal treatment St. John’s Wort can be helpful for this kind of depression, as well as the Kapha type. In terms of qualities, St. John’s Wort is bitter and pungent. Because bitterness can aggravate Vata, start with a small dose (300 mg/day). With Kapha symptoms, the dose may need to be higher: 300 mg two or three times per day. This herb stabilizes prana Vata, the aspect of Vata that governs the brain and neurotransmitters.
    • Do not take this supplement with birth control pills. It can render oral contraception ineffective because it speeds up hormone processing in the liver.
    • Do not take if on an SSRI, unless under the guidance of an experienced physician.
  • Passionflower is a wonderful supplement, especially in conjunction with St. John’s Wort. Passionflower is calming to the nervous system, which is why it is included in the Vata section. It has ever-increasing evidence supporting its use for anxiety. Paired with St. John’s Wort, the effect is synergistic: greater benefit for both anxiety and depression than either used alone. By pure Ayurvedic qualities, this herb could also help Pittadepression; aim for a dosage between 400–800 mg/day.
  • Chamomile is worth considering for Vata-type depression. High doses may be a bit drying, but at moderate doses, the soothing effect predominates. It is evidence-based for anxiety, and new studies suggest it may have anti-depressant effects as well, at doses of  250–500 mg/day.
  • The Ayurvedic herb jatamansi has a long history of use as a Vata-balancer with doses ranging from 450-1,000 mg/day. It is commonly used for anxiety and sleep. It may have some mild anti-depressant benefits as well.
  • Ashwagandha was discussed in the Kapha section, but it is also an effective balancer of Vata. Thus, it deserves to be part of the Ayurvedic approach to either Vata or Kaphadepression between 350–800 mg/day.
  • Gotu kola can be beneficial to all of the doshas, but since it perhaps has the strongest evidence for use with anxiety, it is included here. There are no studies (yet) looking at gotu kola for depression in humans, but there are several rodent studies suggesting benefit; consider a dose of 700–1,400 mg/day.
  • Daily probiotics are beneficial for all doshas, especially Vata and Kapha since they have naturally weaker digestion compared to Pitta. The data is resoundingly favorable and becomes even more so if specific strains of bacteria are ingested. B. longumL. rhamnosusL. reuteri, and L. helveticus are several that have been found especially helpful.
  • Turmeric has received much publicity due to its extensive scientifically documented success with depression at doses of 1,500–2,000 mg/day. Take with black pepper. Prolonged high doses may be aggravating for Vata and Pitta, but temporary use is helpful for all doshas.
  • Practice daily self-massage with a warming oil (sesame or almond).
  • Encourage restful sleep with bedtime around 10 p.m. Use herbs to support this, if needed. Ashwagandha, passionflower, tulsi, and jatamansi can help.

Spiritual Perspectives

Depression is an opportunity—a chance to face your darkest thoughts and feelings with understanding and openness. It is a chance to nurture and heal yourself. Spiritually, transforming depression involves facing one’s own depths and coming to terms with choices, disappointments, fears, traumas, and more. Each case of depression is unique, but the common answer to all of them is your own love. If you are willing to open your heart to your own pain and make compassionate space for it, you are on your way to healing.

If you suffer from depression, take the wildest self-affirming action possible and fully commit to being here—on the planet and in your body. Wishing to leave is distracting and essentially delays healing. Have compassion for your soul for choosing a challenging life. Honor your soul’s wisdom by vowing to walk your unique path, even if it’s hard—even with depression.

Depression is your teacher. Trying to understand it will teach you about yourself and the world. Cultivating happiness is a practice. Every day requires maintenance. Try not to doubt your journey. Integrate your prior choices and values into your current sense of self. This will help you feel cohesive and strong. Feeling empowered now makes it easier to create a future that includes a heart at peace. The road is inward and may be long, but a heart at peace in a balanced body will surely find its way.

*Editor’s Note: The information in this article is intended for your educational use only; it is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition and before undertaking any diet, supplement, fitness, or other health programs. 

 

 

By Breanna Pereira, NASM-Certified Personal Trainer and NASM-Certified Nutrition Coach - May 2020

How fitting that the anniversary of the acceptance of my depression would fall around Mental Health Awareness Month. Last year, I had paid no attention to it; this year, I am excited to pay homage to it. However, like most celebrations over the past couple of months, this will be spent with the looming effects of the global pandemic COVID-19. It’s hard to believe that it has almost been a year since I’ve had one of the most pivotal conversations of my young adult life—and it started with one simple question from a coworker:

“How are you really doing?”

This led me to admit to something I had been resisting for almost 10 years: I have depression and I need professional help in order to overcome it. I had mastered the art of masking my mental distress, but I eventually learned that masking is not a cure. It was a painful combination of fear, shame, and resistance.

As a health fitness specialist in the San Francisco/Bay Area, I am supposed to be the hype (wo)man. The one who motivates others to want to make changes to increase their quality of life, but that goes far beyond a number on a scale. It also entails the social, emotional, and spiritual aspects of life. I realized that if I wanted to be authentic in my career, it was going to require me to step outside of myself and seek help. In order to celebrate change, and to encourage it in others, I needed to embrace it wholeheartedly in my own life first.

I remember sitting in the waiting room of my therapist’s office and filling out the initial assessment forms.

Circle what applies to you.

Circling depression is what made it all real.

Overcoming the Stigmas Around Mental Health

Depression is something that I’ve known has always lived inside of me, but I was too afraid to say it out loud. I was afraid of the stigma that comes with the words: depression, anxiety, and therapy.

After a handful of sessions, my therapist helped me realize that those stigmas would only become a reality if I chose to breathe life into them. I have to constantly remind myself that I am on a journey of self-discovery, understanding, and self-compassion.

As a “recovering perfectionist and an aspiring ‘good-enoughist’” (thank you, Brené Brown), this has been an incredibly difficult year for me. Taking the time to chip away these walls I have built and become comfortable with openness and transparency is one of the scariest things I have ever done, but knowing that I have been able to overcome each fall by embracing and learning from each situation were signs of growth.

That growth has been tested daily since the start of this pandemic. Not only have I had to call on existing tools to preserve the progress that I’ve made, but I have also been pushed to develop new tools to help overcome the challenges that have risen over the past seven weeks. The biggest question that needed to be addressed: What if I can’t handle this anymore? Will that mean that all the progress I’ve made over the past year will have been for nothing?

In an attempt to calm my anxious mind, I have been able to uncover one of the most important tools: reflection. Now is the time to reflect on just how far I’ve come and to start actively developing a routine that utilizes each of the tools I have learned over the past year. While everyone is different and deals with their journeys of self-discovery and mental health differently, these are some tools that have helped me when I’ve recognized it’s time for action.

1. Read

By reading an hour before bed, I am able to give my mind an opportunity to escape our crazy pandemic reality and to start exploring new techniques to facilitate growth. These are some books that haReading at homeve helped to provide that for me:

2. Journal

I found a journal that has “BLOOM” written across the cover. For me, this serves as a reminder that the “blooming” process takes time, and that the environment I create will determine whether I will wilt or bloom. I don’t journal every day because a strict regimen in regard to self-expression creates a toxic perfectionist monster in my mind. Instead, I use this tool when I need a place to vent, to remind myself that I am strong, but that I don’t need to have everything figured out right now.

3. Exercise

Today, not only is fitness my career, but it has also become a physical representation of growth and success. I have a personal trainer. He and the rest of the Red Dot Fitness community have helped me uncover strength that I didn’t realize I had. By having a place where I can be surrounded by inspiring and passionate individuals, I always walked out of there feeling renewed.

During these weeks of quarantine, they have still been able to provide this sense of revival for me through live workouts and personal training sessions. They have been able to provide a sense of community even during this time of social distancing.

4. MeditateAt home workout

In the past, I had tried to implement meditation into my routine, but it never worked because my approach to meditation was all wrong. The idea of being and remaining present is difficult for a naturally anxious perfectionist like me, but the guided meditations from Headspace have taught me that it is natural for the mind to go off track. Actively navigating my thoughts and emotions, when times get hard, is something I never thought I had the strength to do.

Every tool in my toolbox may seem quite simple, but what makes them highly effective is that I’ve discovered how and why they give me strength. I’ve allowed myself to gain a better sense of self-compassion, a working understanding of the importance of communication, and the power that arises when you take the time to slow down and breathe—and it’s hard to believe that it all started with one simple question of how am I really doing?

Recognizing your mental state, and then healing, doesn’t happen overnight; it is an ever-growing process. I hope that by sharing in my story you might allow others some room to breathe and practice being kind to yourself--especially during these trying times. While I may be celebrating one year of healing this month, practicing and respecting your mental health is a lifelong commitment, and I will forever be walking that journey alongside you.

 

Has your home office chair been killing you after COVID lockdown, with all that extra screen time? 


As children, our discs are more watery in substance, but the discs thicken with age & poor posture, leading to less mobility & stiffness of the spine. The thickening is a result of how our fascia system works: where there is tension or compression, the body will produce an excess of collagen fibres, thickening the discs. As the disc thickens, the gel-like nucleus losses water & compresses, leading to spinal nerve impingement, pain & stiffness.


We can assist our disc physiology by practicing good alignment & doing therapeutic exercises that increase spinal extension. 
Avoiding caffeine, cigarettes, & alcohol can help disc hydration, since these substances act as diuretics.

 
Practicing YogAlign that optimises engagement of the natural spinal curves can be like getting a good nights sleep, helping your discs & vertebrae to remain youthful & supple. 


Sitting well is an essential tool for surviving the modern lifestyle which often revolves around sitting in chairs. Learning to correct poor breathing habits & aligning the spine can fix much of what is hurting in the body. 
Modern life with increased use of technology can lead to round shoulders, kyphosis & dowagers hump & premature ageing! 


Contact me for an appointment if you would like to learn some simple tools to increase your awareness of how you are breathing & moving, so you can feel more at ease & comfortable in your own body, prevent dis-ease, & have more energy everyday.

yogalign.co.nz/contact

 

 

See the beauty everywhere

Witnessing this beauty generates love 

Be pure love

 

If you need some guidance in managing your stress levels during this time of transition, I am seeing clients in my studio for private consultations, now we are in level two.

Message, phone or email if you would like to know more.

In love & light Leonie

 

 

Our genes are our predisposition, NOT our fate.

Three things that are critical for healing: It’s 

  1. What you eat
  2. Moving your body 
  3. Learning how to reset your nervous system through relaxing & dealing with chronic stress. EFT tapping is one of the most directed & powerful ways to peel away those layers of chronic stress.

Dr Mark Hyman

Why Loneliness Is A Public Health Issue


When we think about health, we usually think about diet and exercise. We think about the things we are doing for our physical body to promote wellness. But what about the things we can’t see? 

Relationships are a big one. And we now know that loneliness and social isolation are as dangerous for our health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day! That’s an incredible comparison; one that hopefully puts into perspective how vital healthy relationships and human connection are to our wellbeing and longevity. 

Today on The Doctor’s Farmacy, I talk with Dr. Vivek Murthy about nurturing greater connection and what it means for our health. 

Dr. Murthy served as the 19th Surgeon General of the United States between 2014-2017. As the Vice Admiral of the US Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, he commanded a uniformed service of 6,600 public health officers globally. During his tenure, Dr. Murthy launched the TurnTheTide campaign, catalyzing a movement among health professionals to address the nation’s opioid crisis. He also issued the first Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, calling for expanded access to prevention and treatment and for recognizing addiction as a chronic illness, not a character flaw. 

In 2017, Dr. Murthy focused his attention on chronic stress and loneliness as prevalent problems that have profound implications for health, productivity, and happiness. His book Together: The Healing Power of Human Connection in a Sometimes Lonely World was just published on April 28th.

Some of us might wonder how we break out of a rut of loneliness—as busy adults this can sometimes feel especially difficult. Dr. Murthy walks us through some really simple ways to get more connected. Service is one way, which actually stimulates the reward center of the brain and promotes feel-good chemicals. That means devoting some time to helping others in one way or another is actually beneficial to our own personal wellness goals. 

Another step we can take is committing just ten to fifteen minutes a day to talking to someone we love, which is a powerful way to keep ourselves happy and connected during this time of coronavirus quarantine. Pick up the phone, schedule a video call, or sit down with someone in your family and have a real conversation (without the distraction of screens) about what’s going on with you. Chances are if you open up, they will too, and you’ll both be healthier for it. 

Instead of thinking of just the right inputs for health, I invite you to think about what you can give back and how you can reach out to others.

I hope you’ll tune in to this episode of The Doctor’s Farmacy to think more deeply about your relationships and how to prevent loneliness, even if you’re currently alone at home. 

Wishing you health and happiness, 
Mark Hyman, MD
 



Click here to listen on the web

COVID-19 Update: My usual classes have been adapted to work with the current constrictions we have in place.  I am doing regular Zoom YogAlign sessions for my clients, click on YogAlign in Homepage Menu, then click on Booking to see times and contact details. 

If you would like a private session please message, phone or email me, so we can work out a time and day that suits you best.

While we are doing sessions via Zoom, we need to be creative and use whatever gear you have available, if you have a yoga mat that would be ideal. Other props you can use are a shoebox instead of blocks, a strap, belt or scarf, pillows or bolsters and maybe a hand towel to cover eyes for shavasana (these are not essential items), and some drinking water handy. Once you have confirmed your booking, I shall email you a Zoom link just prior to the class. Just click on link to join me and I shall click my end, to l let you in.

Please don't hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.  

In Health & Happiness

Love Leonie x

 

 

With stress and anxiety at an all-time high these days, it's more important than ever to find ways to process our difficult emotions. This goes beyond simply finding ways to cope and self-soothe, although these are also important.

Part of processing emotions in a healthy way is taking time to actually feel our feelings rather than immediately springing to "manage" or get rid of them. When we allow ourselves to sit with our emotions and identify what they are and where they come from, we can start to understand more about ourselves and our core needs.

Sexuality doula and sex educator Ev'Yan Whitney recently shared with us one particularly tactile way of doing this that can easily be done from home: sensual dance meditation. Think of it as a type of mindfulness-based, unstructured movement that allows you to fully be in your body—and your emotions.

How sensual dance can help process emotions.

If you instinctively bristle at the idea of dancing, just stay with me here!

Many of us tense up just thinking about dancing—because we feel self-conscious, because it perhaps feels silly, or because it's just not something we normally do. But sensual dance meditation, as Whitney conceives of it, isn't about performance, skill, or any structure at all really. This type of dancing is actually less about the dancing itself and more about tuning into yourself and your emotions. It's giving those emotions an outlet through which they can be expressed.

"Using dance or some kind of movement to move out that energy, to move out the anxiety, the fear, the lack of self-worth, the lack of self-confidence, is just a great way to connect to ourselves," Whitney tells me. "Emotions want to be moved out. That's why they call it e-motion."

Whitney says her dance meditations are often a mix of both joy and pain. "It's like getting more clear about what is underneath the surface... Allowing ourselves to feel sadness. Allowing ourselves to feel regret."

Dancing—when practiced mindfully and intuitively rather than performatively for others—can essentially be a way to move emotions that are stagnant in the body. You know that feeling of being overwhelmed, like your whole body feels heavy or weighed down by stress? Movement can help to relieve some of that pressure. While taking a walk or exercising shares some similar benefits with dancing, more unstructured movement taps into your intuition. You move the way you want to move, based on how you're feeling. In this way, emotions can be expressed more freely.

"There's something about just allowing our bodies to move the way our bodies want to move, without judgment, without trying to do any choreography," she explains. "When I dance, I give my body permission to do what it wants to do, to show up the way it wants to show up, to feel and emote in a way that it wants to feel and emote."

 

How to try it.

Whitney regularly leads sensual dance meditations on her Instagram if you want a little guidance, but she offers this exercise if you'd like to try it on your own:

1. Put on a song or two that gets you moving.

You may consider putting together a short playlist on songs you resonate with. They can be songs that you know. The idea is simply that each song "automatically and intuitively gets you moving, and then your body just does the rest."

Whitney adds, "They don't have to be fast songs. I actually like to play with both slow songs and fast songs because it just gives my body different ways to experience and to feel. But put on a song and just dance to it."

2. Be mindful as you move.

This is not necessarily supposed to be like "ooh, I love my body, and I'm moving it, and it feels so good!"

Although it might totally be like that when you're feeling great, this exercise is about getting in touch with any emotions you're feeling—positive and negative.

"Just say, whatever comes up, however my body wants to move, I'm going to let it move, and I'm going to be very mindful in the dancing. I'm just going to dance it out," Whitney says.

She recommends prompting yourself with questions as you move: What emotions are coming up for me in this moment? As I move my arms like this, what emotion wants to be released? As I move my hips like this, what am I shaking loose?

"Even if the questions can't be prompted, I always remind people that remembering to breathe is enough," Whitney adds. "Just connect to the breath."

3. Don't overthink it.

Try not to get caught up in thinking about how to move your arms or your hips. No one's watching you.

If you're struggling to get out of your head, Whitney again recommends just focusing in on your breath. When you focus on breathing and paying careful attention to the feeling of the air moving in and out through your lungs, you're better able to connect with your body. "It can be a really great way to disconnect a little bit from your brain, from that self-talk, and just really get into the flow of that movement," she says.

4. Allow yourself to feel your feelings.

Notice whatever emotions come up. They might sound like: I'm feeling scared. I'm feeling anxious. I'm feeling like I should be doing better right now.

Just notice them.

"I use dance as a way to move those emotions out," Whitney says. "Maybe they're not moved out completely, but just to get them moving. It helps to invite other new and more possible energies in like hope, joy, pleasure, things like that."

What can I do to support & love my body?

 

Breathe work - breathe is key & free! A negative thought or belief will have an effect on your physical body.  With this awareness, focus on the following. 

 

Place your hands on your heart and take 3 deep breathes, this will help calm your sympathetic nervous system & bring you into the present moment. 

 

Count to 4 while you inhale through your nose

Hold your breath while counting to 7

Count to 8 as you slowly exhale through your mouth

This helps you to release any fear, anxiety, tension, or energy that’s not serving you.

 

Repeat at least 2 more rounds, tuning into your body.

Carry on, for a few more deep breathes, if you feel you need too, your body will thank you for it.

 

Be gentle on yourself.  If breathe work is new to you, start off slowly.

Try doing this once a day either first thing when you rise or before you to to bed.

It's the little daily gifts to yourself, that create big shifts in your wellness.

 

Mahalo 

 

 

Let’s unite with an open heart for a global peace meditation today
at 2.45pm NZST Sunday 5th April 2020
www.globalpeacemeditation.com 

 

Caramel Apple Soft Serve

Trade dairy soft serve for this heavenly, creamy, fruit-based option. Made with banana, apple, and dates, this soft serve is a virus-fighting, liver-healing treat you can feel good about enjoying as often as you’d like!

This delicious recipe is one of over 75 recipes in the new book, Medical Medium Cleanse to Heal: Healing Plans for Sufferers of Anxiety, Depression, Acne, Eczema, Lyme, Gut Problems, Brain Fog, Weight Issues, Migraines, Bloating, Vertigo, Psoriasis, Cysts, Fatigue, PCOS, Fibroids, UTI, Endometriosis & Autoimmune.

Let's take a look at how some of the key ingredients in this recipe offer healing support:


Apples: Provide living water to support the liver’s hydration capabilities, so it can store the water and then release it back into the bloodstream when dehydration or dirty blood syndrome occurs. The fruit acids in apples help cleanse the liver by dispersing toxic films that build up inside its storage banks. Apples starve out bacteria, yeast, mold, other funguses, and viruses from the intestinal tract and liver. Great for dissolving gallstones.

Bananas: The fructose in banana is liver’s favorite source of food. It provides quick fuel to the liver and wakes up sleepy cells, increasing their ingenuity and work output. Soothes the linings of the intestinal tract and also soothes the nerves attached to the intestinal tract. Contrary to popular belief, bananas are one of the most antibacterial, anti-yeast, antifungal foods. A great food to combine with other nutrient-rich foods or to take with supplements, because they improve the liver’s ability to absorb nutrients.

Dates: The intestinal tract builds up mucus due to low hydrochloric acid and bile production, and that can slow down absorption of nutrients into the bloodstream. Dates expel and eliminate mucus, especially that produced by pathogens such as bacteria and fungus, from the colon. The sugars in dates feed the liver; they’re a great source of glucose for recovery and restoration that allows the liver to maximize its over 2,000 chemical functions.


Caramel Apple Soft Serve Recipe

Ingredients:
1 apple, diced and frozen 

1 frozen banana 
2 to 3 medjool dates, pitted 
1 teaspoon alcohol-free vanilla extract or 1/4 teaspoon vanilla bean powder (optional) 
2 to 3 tablespoons water, if needed to blend

Directions:
Place all the ingredients in a high-speed blender or food processor and blend until smooth. Add as little water as possible and scrape down the sides as needed. Serve immediately. Makes 1 serving.

Learn more about how to cleanse to heal in my new book Cleanse To Heal available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and anywhere books are sold. 

Love and many blessings,
Anthony William

 

It is our innate nature to want to survive, alleviate the stress & thrive.  We need to honor our bodies through our everyday, healthy choices, and find some deeper sense of peace.

 

We need to find acceptance of our current situation rather than resist it. 

 

Over the last several days I have been feeling rather distracted and scattered with my hyperactive mind. I have tried to collate information from my own experiences, and so many others, to share, and to help empower you to take an active role in your wellness. This way you are able to take some practical steps to give yourself a greater sense of ease.

 

This list of symptoms is taken from Gregg Braden’s You Tube video Truth and Fiction Coronavirus, which I would highly recommend, to give you some clarity around the global pandemic and what actions to take.

 

I would also like to express thanks to all those who have imparted science, ancient wisdom and generous support and love, of whom there are many.

 

“The natural healing force within each of us is the greatest force in getting well.” Hippocrates

 

Some tips to help you support & maintain your optimal wellness

 

Set your intention to gain & maintain your optimal wellness.

 

Common Sense

.        wash and dry your hands after touching surfaces 

.           cover for a cough or sneeze 

.           if you are sick stay at home

.           social distancing NOT social isolation – call people especially the elderly 

 

Your Natural Defenses

Your body knows what to do! When we support our body for what it is designed to do. Honor your body.

.           strengthen your immune system

.           relieve stress

.           good sleep habits

.           movement and exercise

.           nutrition & supplements

.           communication, collaboration & community

 

 

Tools – What can I do to support & love my body?

 

Breathe work - breathe is key & free! A negative thought or belief will have an effect on your physical body.  With this awareness try the following: (there are many more examples of breathe work):

To help calm the sympathetic nervous system place your hands on your heart and take 3 deep breathes:

Count to 4 while you inhale

Hold your breathe while counting to 7

Count to 8 as you slowly exhale, helping to release any fear & anxiety, or energy that’s not serving you.

Repeat at least 2 more rounds, tuning into your body, and carry on for as long as you feel you need to.

 

Movement, exercise, dance, sing, play – do what ever brings you joy! Crank up the music.

 

Nature Heals – get into the outdoors as often as you are able.

 

Nutrition – stay hydrated & eat as many wholefoods as you can – local, seasonal, unprocessed, living, nutrient dense, high fibre, organic/spray free/GM free when possible.  Stimulate your sense of smell & taste, & support your well-being with herbs and spices.  Plant a garden, even if you only have room for a few pots.

Ask your health practitioner regarding health supplements to support your optimal wellness & boost your immunity ie vitamin C, Zinc, anti-viral preparations.

“If there is only one thing you can do to have a healthier body is to have a healthier gut.  There is nothing more powerful to protect you than to have a healthy micro biome, or there is nothing more powerful than to have a healthier micro biome, to have a healthier brain function.” Dr Mark Hyman

“We are the health of all our cells. “ Dr Libby Weaver

 

Surrender & self-love practices like yoga, meditation, try to be patient and present (being mindful), express gratitude for what you do have. Listen to your intuition, your innate self, where the true wisdom lies. Emotional Freedom Technique – tapping on meridian points on the body, derived from acupuncture, can release energy blockages that can cause negative emotions.  There are lots of great sites and videos offering you various yoga, breathing, tapping & meditation practices. 

 

Social connection – have clear boundaries, beware of the conversations you have, choose carefully who you spend your free time with, & avoid too much media.  Show compassion and kindness to yourself, family, friends and the wider community.  “Community builds Immunity” Dr LeRoy.  Connect with people and share.

 

Be gentle on yourself – it’s OK to feel anxious, angry, afraid or unsafe. Allow yourself to express your feelings, and then practice some self-love.  Try to minimize or remove triggers that stress you. Take control of your mind, adjust your thoughts & perspective of your experiences – what’s the benefits in this I’m not seeing? Ensure you have daily expressions of gratitude.

 

Create a bedtime ritual – try to clear your mind prior to going to bed ie turn off IT by 7pm – phone, computer, TV.  Try journaling, reading, a bath in Epsom salts & essential oils, a foot soak in a bucket if you don’t have a bath, self massage or offer to give a massage, listen to your circadian rhythm, eat at regular times, & rise with the sun, & sleep as soon after sunset as your routine allows.  These sorts of practices will help you slip into the parasympathetic nervous system with more ease, enabling your body to rest, digest, reproduce & rejuvenate.

 

Tweak you personal hygiene habits including cleaning – door handles, key boards, phones, steering wheels, kitchen benches, bathrooms, etc.  Wash hand towels, tea towels, towels, clothes, etc, regularly. Use antiseptic solutions – you can make your own with essential oils – recipes on the internet. 

 

More words from Gregg Braden

What can we expect? It depends on our response – individually & collectively.  We are now beyond the containment window. 

Mitigation phase – defined: The action of reducing the severity, seriousness, or painfulness of something.

 

When we are self-isolating ourselves we are giving a gift to ourselves and others, to reflect, find peace, heal and express gratitude.

 

A New Normal:

.           shifts in society

.           shifts in economies (sharing of vital resources)

.           shifts in lifestyle – more localized.

 

An awakening of Consciousness – supported by so many beautiful beings. 

 

This is an opportunity to love more, serve, and support.  

 

Keep shining your own unique and bright light.

 

In health & happiness Leonie Main

 

 

 

Three Ways To Avoid Age-Related Circadian Rhythm Disruption

Dr Christiane Northrup MD

Occasional problems with sleep are common at midlife, often secondary to hot flashes and night sweats, or anxiety and depression—which often occur together in midlife women. Between 20 and 40 percent of women have sleep disorders, and women in perimenopause often need more sleep and suffer from insomnia more often than do men of the same age.

When we don’t get sufficient sleep, we not only become tired and irritable, but we are more accident-prone and exhibit decreased concentration, efficiency, and work motivation. Inadequate sleep can cause errors in judgment. Plus, lack of sleep causes stress hormones to rise, which over time can disrupt hormonal balance and depress the immune system. Too little sleep over time can put you at greater risk for obesityheart disease, and diabetes.

Sleep is also critical for consolidation of learning and memory, and it serves as a way to help us sort out in our minds and bodies the things we have learned and experienced during the day. In fact, studies have linked a nightly battle with insomnia to memory loss, dementia, and even Alzheimer’s, not to mention other brain disorders, including Parkinson’s.

Why You Can’t Sleep at Midlife

Hot flashes and night sweats are by far the most common reasons for sleep deprivation at midlife. In many women at menopause, the brain chemicals that are important for sleep undergo changes, making our bodies become less efficient at falling into a deep sleep – the sleep that is associated with the release of human growth hormone and memory consolidation, and that is essential for feeling rested in the morning — and more easily aroused by internal or external stimuli.

Your ability to sleep is also profoundly affected by your feelings. At midlife, many women experience increased demands at work and at home. Insomnia and hot flashes are exacerbated by underlying unresolved and unprocessed emotions, such as stress, anxiety, sadness, fear, and anger, and the unfinished business that fuels these symptoms, creating a perfect storm for poor sleep.

9 Natural Sleep Aids for Insomnia

Natural sleep aids can help with occasional midlife sleep problems. But, it’s important to remember that some natural sleep aids bind to the same place in the brain as prescription sleep drugs. And, like prescription drugs, natural sleep aids can lose their effectiveness over time. Be sure to consult your physician before taking any supplements.

2% progesterone cream. Try bioidentical progesterone cream. Use one-quarter to one-half teaspoon at bedtime on skin. Progesterone binds to the GABA receptors in the brain and has a calming effect.

Pueraria mirifica. This herb has been used in Thailand for over 700 years to help women quell perimenopausal symptoms. It’s ability to interact with the body’s own estrogen to help diminish hot flashes makes it excellent for calming the mind and body at night.

Amantilla and Babuna. These natural medicines originate from the valerian plant (Valeriana officinalis) and the flower of the manzanilla plant (Matricaria recutita, commonly known as chamomile), respectively. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled multicentered study, Amantilla was 82.5 percent effective in helping patients sleep, while Babuna was 68.8 percent effective. On nights when you’re keyed up, try 15 drops of Babuna thirty minutes before going to bed, followed by 15 drops of Amantilla at bedtime.

Valerian. Look for valerian (Valeriana officinalis) in capsule form, as it has a bad taste. The dosage is 150–300 mg of a product standardized to 0.8% valerenic acid. Use one hour before bedtime.

Melatonin. Melatonin is secreted by the brain’s pineal gland in response to cycles of light and darkness. It helps your body regulate its sleep-wake cycles, so it can be good for travel-related insomnia. Natural melatonin secretion is also affected by depression, shift work, and seasonal affective disorder (SAD). The usual dose is 0.5–3.0 mg, taken one hour before bedtime.

5–HTP. 5-HTP (5–hydroxytryptophan) increases serotonin, which is converted to melatonin. This is why 5-HTP may be helpful for sleep pattern disruption, as well as PMS and seasonal affective disorder (SAD). The starting dose is 100 mg, three times per day. Gradually increase over several months to 200 mg, three times per day.

Magnesium. Magnesium deficiency is associated with insomnia. Most people, especially women, have less-than-optimal magnesium levels. If you experience restless sleep or wake up frequently during the night, adding magnesium may help you sleep more soundly.

Magnolia bark. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, magnolia bark is used to promote relaxation and sleep, as well as to ease anxiety and stress by lowering adrenaline. Research shows that magnolia bark can reduce the time it takes you to fall asleep and can increase the amount of time you spend in both REM sleep and NREM sleep. For people with anxiety, magnolia bark can be as effective as the drug diazepam without the risks of dependency or side effects. The standard dosage is around 250 – 500 mg daily with a higher dosage recommended for improving sleep.

L-Theanine. This amino acid found in tea leaves increases the levels of GABA, serotonin, and dopamine – calming neurotransmitters in the brain that regulate emotions, mood, concentration, alertness, sleep, and energy. Increased levels of these chemicals help with sleep, as well as menopause-related mood swings, difficulty concentrating and changes to appetite during menopause.

Be sure to avoid prescription and over-the-counter sleep medications. They are habit-forming and lose their effectiveness over time as the brain builds up a tolerance so that you need more and more to get the same effect. If you do use them, make sure you use it for no longer than 7 to 10 consecutive days. Over-the-counter sleep remedies are troublesome, too, because they interfere with the production of the brain chemical acetylcholine, which is very important for memory. The use of these drugs over time can cause serious memory problems and confusion

15 Ways to Get a Good Night’s Sleep

  1. Take a good multivitamin/mineral daily.Taking nutritional supplements can contribute greatly to your overall health. When you are in good health, you have a better likelihood of sleeping without disturbances, including those caused by medications and pain. In addition to a multivitamin and mineral supplement, you may want to take an antioxidant supplement daily.
  2. Avoid alcohol.While you may fall asleep quickly after drinking, alcohol can interrupt your circadian rhythm. Another reason you don’t sleep well when you drink alcohol is because alcohol blocks REM sleep, the most restorative type of sleep, so you wake up feeling groggy. Finally, alcohol reduces anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) so you may have to get up to urinate during the night.
  3. Limit caffeine. Women metabolize caffeine much more slowly than men. Even one cup of coffee in the morning can affect your sleep quality later if you are sensitive.
  4. Get regular exercise. Regular exercise can improve the quality and quantity of sleep. Being physically active can make you feel more tired at bedtime. In addition, exercise can reduce stress levels, making it easier to fall and stay asleep. Mind-body exercises such as gentle yoga can help quiet the parasympathetic nervous system, which can help you relax before bed. Just don’t exercise vigorously within three to six hours of bedtime.
  5. Get a good quality mattress. Be sure your mattress supports you and does not cause any stress on your joints. A good mattress is worth the investment—you spend a third of your life asleep!
  6. Sleep in a dark room. Excess light in your bedroom – such as the artificial light emitted from streetlights, televisions, or smartphones and other devices – can disrupt your circadian rhythm by suppressing the production of melatonin.
  7. Follow a low-glycemic diet. High blood sugar and insulin are often associated with poor sleep because they are associated with high cortisol levels at night. When cortisol is high at night, your rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is disrupted. This can leave you feeling unrefreshed, no matter how many hours of sleep you get.
  8. Don’t eat before bed. There are a number of reasons why eating a large meal before bed isn’t the best idea, including the possibility of weight gain if you do this regularly. In addition, your body digests food better when you are upright. So, lying down to sleep after a heavy meal may cause you to experience heartburn or acid reflux. Since it takes about 3 hours for your stomach to empty after a meal, a good rule of thumb is to stop eating at least 3 hours before bed. However, a light snack (one high in protein and low in refined carbohydrates) is okay and may even help some people sleep better.
  9. Stop Drinking Water. While you want to be optimally hydrated at all times, drinking a lot of water before bed may cause you to wake up in the middle of the night to go to the bathroom, which causes a big disruption to your sleep cycles. Try to drink (and eat) more water during the day and less late at night. If you do need some water, take small sips rather than big gulps.
  10. Tidy Up. I’m not suggesting that you clean your entire house top to bottom. But, straightening up, washing the dinner dishes, preparing your kitchen for your morning routine, or putting away your clothes can be great ways to bring your attention to the moment. Plus, having a tidy house can reduce cortisol levels, helping you to feel more relaxed.
  11. Make a to-do list. If you tend to worry about things you need to do tomorrow while lying in bed, it helps to write them down before going to sleep. You may also want to leave a pen and a piece of paper next to your bed so if you wake up and think of something you forgot, you can jot it down. (You can also write down your dreams.)
  12. Stay calm. Don’t watch the news (or disturbing movies) before bed—it activates the sympathetic nervous system. For the same reason, try not to have emotionally distressing conversations near bedtime, and try not to stew over things. (If you find you are turning things over and over in your mind, get out of bed and do something else relaxing, such as taking a bath or reading a good book for a while).
  13. Wind down: Establishing a ritual that helps you wind down before bed can help to signal your mind and body that it’s time for sleep. Change into your PJs and get completely ready for bed at least half an hour before you climb between the sheets.
  14. Shut off all electronics. The blue light that comes off screens mimics the light of full daylight, which can affect melatonin production and disrupt your sleep patterns. Plus, checking email and social media before bed can cause overthinking and increase stress and worry when you are trying to go to sleep.
  15. Practice mindfulness. Mindfulness helps to decrease stress levels and increase relaxation, which can help you fall asleep faster and stay asleep. You can practice mindfulness by sitting quietly, stretching, or gently practicing yoga, or reciting affirmations before bed.

3 Ways to Avoid Circadian Rhythm Disruption at Midlife and Beyond

Your circadian rhythm is your 24-hour internal clock. It helps to determine your sleep-wake patterns, as well as physical, mental and behavioral differences throughout the day. You’re your circadian rhythm even affects your metabolism.

As you grow older, your circadian rhythm changes so many people experience a decrease in the length and quality of sleep. This may result in feeling tired and even experiencing cognitive decline later in the day. And studies show that disruption of the circadian rhythm is linked to obesitymood disorderscardiovascular disease, and even cancer.

Fortunately, you can overcome age-related circadian rhythm changes with a few simple strategies. Here are 3 ways you can reset your circadian rhythm and keep it on track so you experience better sleep:

  1. Spend time in nature. The primary external influence on your circadian rhythm is light. Most people have limited light exposure during the day and an increased amount of artificial light during the evening, which can contribute to disruption of your circadian rhythm. Spending more time outdoors can help restore your natural sleep-wake cycle. One good option is to go camping for a few days where you have no (or very little) artificial light. This will help set your body to “solar” time. (Be sure to leave your smart phone turned off completely, unless it’s an urgent matter.) If camping is not an option, you can try going outside more frequently during the day, especially if you feel tired. The sunlight can help your body feel awake and help get you through the rest of the day and evening until it’s time to sleep.
  2. Change your schedule. Making gradual changes to your sleep schedule over time can help reset your circadian rhythm. For example, if your current pattern is to go to bed at 12 AM, try going to bed 15 or 30 minutes earlier each week. After a month or two you will have reset your sleep clock to go to bed by 10 PM. If you normally wake up at 6 AM, you will be getting fully 8 hours of sleep. You can also change your schedule to go to bed later and waking later by using the same strategy. Also, shifting when you eat by 15-30 minutes (earlier or later) will also help reset your circadian rhythm.
  3. Try a sleep deprivation challenge. If you’ve even been on an overnight flight and unable to sleep, then stayed up all day once you reached your destination, you have essentially done a sleep deprivation challenge. Sleep deprivation is used in clinical settings as part of chronotherapy and depression treatment. You simply stay up for 24 hours then go to sleep at your regular time the following day. The idea is that depriving yourself of sleep for a day, will help reset your internal clock and overcome sleep problems. However, this is not for everyone. It’s best to work with your healthcare provider. And you should not drive or plan any activities while sleep-deprived.

Remember, persistent sleep problems are often messages from your inner guidance system that something is off balance in your life. You need to address the imbalance directly before you can truly have quality sleep

Are you getting quality sleep? What are some of the things you do when you have trouble sleeping? 

For more information check out www.drnorthrup.com

 

 

The tension we feel in our bodies often comes from weak & dysfunctional breath patterning. When our breath is powerful & balanced, it creates a sense of ease throughout our physical & emotional body. When we are not breathing well, our spine is collapsed, & the diaphragm is weakened, so we begin to rely on the neck & back muscles to hold up our structure & help us breathe.

Weak breathing habits lead to poor posture, which cause tightness & tension as muscles assume the burden of functions they are not designed to perform. It is no longer just the elderly who show signs of poor posture, as habitual slouching & poor alignment increasingly affect young people as well.

Observing muscle balance & posture may lead us to conclude that a slouched person might be holding feelings of depression. Are they depressed from slouching? or are they slouching from depression? If we focus on changing patterns through core breathing, our body will naturally feel light, & our mental energy will be free to express itself. We can become enslaved in a stress cycle simply from poor breathing & the resultant bad posture & negative feelings that this cycle can create. This is an example of carrying "issues in our tissues." When we are aligned & breathing well, it is actually difficult to frown. Conversely, it becomes difficult to smile when one is slouching. Poor breathing leads to poor alignment, which leads to depression, which leads to poor alignment, which leads to poor breathing, & so on. It's easy to become stuck in this stress cycle when our modern lifestyles demand that we spend so many of our waking hours in a chair. Utilising YogAlign core breathing to align our spine & balance our muscular-fascial web, we can positively impact our reservoir of mental & physical energy and the quality of our thoughts.

Your breath defines your movements, your posture, your mood, and eventually, determines your life span. Learn to breathe with purpose & passion, in order to re-create who you are - a vital, passionate & loving being!

Much Love to Michaelle Edwards creator of YogAlign

Thanks to all the beautiful people that participated 
Congratulations Alexandra Holmes @alexcatriona !! You & your bestie have Won the Ultimate Mount Pamper Package ... Oh Bliss
Contact us for details 
Love to you all & have a special weekend ?

A special thanks to Kelly from Mount Skin & Body, Jasmine from Cocorose, Lisa from Satori Lounge & Nicole from Zen Float Spa.  You women are the best! xxxx

Take action ... small micro moments every day to create your extraordinary life!

Women's Weekend Wellness Retreat

Join us Friday afternoon 27 to Sunday afternoon 29 September 2019

Take time to return your whole being back to a place of balance & harmony through connection, nutrition, yogalign & meditation, at the tranquil Mana Retreat in the Coromandel. 

This is your opportunity to reset yourself, in time to embrace summer & the Christmas craziness  

A wee bit about us ...

 

Jaz's wholistic lifestyle approach will enhance your energy levels, mental well-being & awareness. Registered Nurse, Naturopath, Massage Therapist, Alchemist - Founder of Cocorose IG:cocorose_nz

 

Leonie is passionate about supporting people to find their joy, while creating a vibrant, healthy & balanced life. Therapeutic YogAlign Instructor, Reiki Master, Massage Therapist, Nurse, EFT Facilitator, Nature Lover, Design & Art Admirer IG:leonie.gypsetlife

 

An insight into Your retreat weekend 

 

Nutrition

 

Create your awareness around the connection of gut health, emotional well-being, energy levels, immunity & weight management. Let us help you gain a fresh perspective on low moods & anxiety.

 

YogAlign

 

A therapeutic style of yoga from Hawaii, that connects breath, posture, mindfulness & movement practices into your everyday. A tool to help align yourself with your passions & purpose. Yoking all facets of yourself - mental, emotional, spiritual & physical.

 

Meditation 

 

Finding your own unique meditation practice to bring more joy, stillness & presence into your life.  

 

Create

 

Lift your spirits, creating your own rose facial spritzer & essential oil blend to take home. The perfect calming, anti-aging & hydrating products for sunny days. 

 

Nourish

 

Delicious & nutritious vegetarian food & you don’t have to lift a finger! Tea & coffee provided. Sorry no meat, drugs or alcohol. Re-energising & gentle bush walk with coastal views. 

Workshop

On the importance of a healthy gut and how it effects your mood & well-being

Connection

 

Connecting with like-minded individuals, while exploring the intricate connection of your mind, body, spirit & surroundings.

 

Pamper

 

Free use of Sauna.  Massage treatments, as therapists are available, at an extra cost.  $40 30mins & $80 60mins.

 

Sleep

 

Two nights twin shared accommodation, towels & bedding included. Some single rooms available.

 

Investment

 

$450 per person. An additional $60 single room supplement available - limited number only.

 

Internet

 

Wifi available in the main centre building. Mobile reception available.

 

Location

 

608 Manaia Road, RD1, Coromandel, 3581. Allow 2.5 hours for your drive from Tauranga.

 

Book

 

Enter into your calendar now! Friday 27 September 2019, check-in 4pm includes dinner, to Sunday 29 September, check-out 2pm includes lunch Sunday. All planned events are completely optional ... if you decide you need to sleep in instead of a morning walk or yoga ... You can :) Email or ring Leonie for further information and to book your spot lThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or mobile 0274 96 96 33. We look forward to hearing from you.

GIVEAWAY! ? Dreamy Pamper Day For Two

Do you dare to rest & rejuvenate?
You owe yourself, the love that you so freely give to others. 

Here’s a chance to do just that with your bestie …

? A private therapeutic YogAlign session for yourself & your friend @leonie.gypsetlife
? Then slip into @mountskinandbody for an hours indulgent massage & facial skin treatment each
? Pop next-door @satorilounge to delight in a delicious sushi lunch for two
? Then it’s time to find your zen @zenfloatspa to completely melt away any excess tension
? The self love continues, with take-home luxury organic skincare products from @cocorose-nz 

To enter, follow all 5 local businesses on IG & FB & tag a friend in the comments. Each tag is an entry. Drawn Friday 11 October 2019!

#selfcare #selflove #metime #nourish #bestfriends #bliss #mtmaunganui#supportlocal @leonie.gypsetlife @cocorose_nz @mountskinandbody @satorilounge @zenfloatspa

Your office chair is killing you! 
As children, our discs are more watery in substance, but the discs thicken with age & poor posture, leading to less mobility & stiffness of the spine. The thickening is a result of how our fascia system works: where there is tension or compression, the body will produce an excess of collagen fibres, thickening the discs. As the disc thickens, the gel-like nucleus losses water & compresses, leading to spinal nerve impingement, pain & stiffness.
We can assist our disc physiology by practicing good alignment & doing therapeutic exercises that increase spinal extension. 
Avoiding caffeine, cigarettes, & alcohol can help disc hydration, since these substances act as diuretics. 
Practicing Yogalign that optimises engagement of the natural spinal curves can be like getting a good nights sleep, helping your discs & vertebrae to remain youthful & supple. 
Sitting well is an essential tool for surviving the modern lifestyle which often revolves around sitting in chairs. Learning to correct poor breathing habits & aligning the spine can fix much of what is hurting in your body. 
Modern life with increased use of technology can lead to round shoulders, kyphosis & dowagers hump & premature ageing! 
Contact me for an appointment if you would like to learn some simple tools to increase your awareness of how you are breathing & moving, so you can feel more at ease in your own body & have more energy everyday ... perfect time to get fit & supple for all those fun summertime activities ?

Take time to return your whole being back to a place of balance & harmony through connection, nutrition, yogalign & meditation, at the tranquil Mana Retreat in the Coromandel. 

This is your opportunity to reset, in time to embrace summer & the Christmas craziness  

A wee bit about us ...

 

Jaz's wholistic lifestyle approach will enhance your energy levels, mental well-being & awareness. Registered Nurse, Naturopath, Massage Therapist, Alchemist - Founder of Cocorose IG:cocorose_nz

 

Leonie is passionate about supporting people to find their joy, while creating a vibrant, healthy & balanced life. Therapeutic YogAlign Instructor, Reiki Master, Massage Therapist, Nurse, EFT Facilitator, Nature Lover, Design & Art Admirer IG:leonie.gypsetlife

 

An insight into Your retreat weekend 

 

Nutrition

 

Create your awareness around the connection of gut health, emotional well-being, energy levels, immunity & weight management. Let us help you gain a fresh perspective on low moods & anxiety.

 

YogAlign

 

A therapeutic style of yoga from Hawaii, that connects breath, posture, mindfulness & movement practices into your everyday. A tool to help align yourself with your passions & purpose. Yoking all facets of yourself - mental, emotional, spiritual & physical.

 

Meditation 

 

Finding your own unique meditation practice to bring more joy, stillness & presence into your life.  

 

Create

 

Lift your spirits, creating your own rose facial spritzer & essential oil blend to take home. The perfect calming, anti-aging & hydrating products for sunny days. 

 

Nourish

 

Delicious & nutritious vegetarian food & you don’t have to lift a finger! Tea & coffee provided. Sorry no meat, drugs or alcohol. Re-energising & gentle bush walk with coastal views. 

Workshop

On the importance of a healthy gut and how it effects your mood & well-being

Connection

 

Connecting with like-minded individuals, while exploring the intricate connection of your mind, body, spirit & surroundings.

 

Pamper

 

Free use of Sauna.  Massage treatments, as therapists are available, at an extra cost.  $40 30mins & $80 60mins.

 

Sleep

 

Two nights twin shared accommodation, towels & bedding included. Some single rooms available.

 

Investment

 

$450 per person. An additional $60 single room supplement available - limited number only.

 

Internet

 

Wifi available in the main centre building. Mobile reception available.

 

Location

 

608 Manaia Road, RD1, Coromandel, 3581. Allow 2.5 hours for your drive from Tauranga.

 

Book

 

Enter into your calendar now! Friday 27 September 2019, check-in 4pm includes dinner, to Sunday 29 September, check-out 2pm includes lunch Sunday. All planned events are completely optional ... if you decide you need to sleep in instead of a morning walk or yoga ... You can :) Email or ring Leonie for further information and to book your spot lThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or mobile 0274 96 96 33. We look forward to hearing from you.

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